Hancinemas Drama Review Strong Family Episodes 35 36

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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Strong Family" Episodes 29-30

The romantic subplots in "Strong Family" are really good in how they relate to each other. We have Ik-hee going through the adolescent awkwardness of a teen romance where no one knows what they're doing, Jeong-min being generally giddy about a relationship that will most likely end in marriage (because of her age), and then Miss Jo contemplating a late lifetime romance. Incidentally, Cho-seop (played by Nam Kyeong-eup) is my favorite love interest of the bunch. The man really rocks his late fifties facial hair.

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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Strong Family" Episodes 31-32

The plot is very fractured over these two episodes. We get a lot of brief jokes that seem like they're going to lead to broader themes, although they stop almost as soon as they start. The closest we get is the bookend of episode thirty-two, which I admittedly thought was pretty funny because of course Cheon-il's dream world looks like a high school theater stage set. If you haven't had dreams like that, I don't know what to tell you.

Elsewhere, a chance encounter forces Gwi-nam to come clean to Jeong-min about his past. It's an interesting miscalculation on his part, because even though Gwi-nam's actions are clearly intended to demonstrate his utmost confidence in Jeong-min's potential as a romantic partner, she has a different interpretation. And it's hard to really begrudge her for that, since Jeong-min explains her frustrations very well, even if I, personally, think she's being a bit unfair.

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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Strong Family" Episodes 33-34

Contrary to my previous expectations, it doesn't look like "Strong Family" is building up to any particularly strong climaxes at the workplace or anywhere else. Cheon-il is obsessed with telekinesis in episode thirty three and basketball comic books in episode thirty four. While I do admit the simple visuals of these scenes are pretty good (Park Hyeok-kwon always has great facial expressions really), without the proper build-up of tension, "Strong Family" currently looks to end about as anticlimactically as it began.

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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Strong Family" Episodes 35-36

The climax to episode thirty six is a school concert that I had mostly forgotten was even a plot point until it pops up, and which as usual just goes into the usual father-daughter bonding. More than the catharsis I actually somewhat perversely liked the general low quality of the performance. It's about the level of musical talent that would be expected from normal high school students, which is quite a contrast to the usual overly high production values that tend to accompany such storylines.

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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "My Sassy Girl - Drama" Episodes 1-2

The first half of the first episode of "My Sassy Girl - Drama" consists entirely of an elaborate royal conspiracy. It involves nighttime, massive swordfights, escapes, a perilous childbirth scene, and is generally completely indistinguishable from a serious historical drama prologue. Then we flash forward ten years later and scholar Gyeon-woo (played by Joo Won) is trying to maintain balance on a boat while narrating about how cool and beloved he was back in China.

"My Sassy Girl - Drama" is low brow in a way seldom seen in Korean dramas anymore. The entire style of humor is plucked straight from the early two thousands, with characters briefly being given dignity for the sole purpose of creating a joke wherein they inevitably lose it. I don't especially like Gyeon-woo. He's really smug. So it was oddly gratifying when he runs into Princess Hyeomhyeong (played by Oh Yeon-seo), who reacts to his coolness by behaving like a drunk psycho.