Hancinemas Film Review Life Risking Romance

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[HanCinema's Film Review]
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[HanCinema's Film Review] "Life Risking Romance"

Je-in (played by Ha Ji-won) is a murder mystery writer who has been on a long slump. The main reason behind said slump is that Je-in is for some neurotic reason completely obsessed with ferreting out largely imaginary murders in the real world, a task in which her beleaguered best friend policeman Rok-hwan (played by Cheon Jeong-myeong) reluctantly assists, to his scorn in the department. The plot in "Life Risking Romance" kicks off when Je-in finally notices that there is, in fact, a real-life serial killer currently operating in Itaewon and maybe she should investigate that instead. For research material, of course.

5 Reasons To Watch Life Risking Romance, A Perfect Dose Of Funny And Scary
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5 Reasons To Watch Life Risking Romance, A Perfect Dose Of Funny And Scary

Romance, comedy, action, thriller, or mystery? Cant quite decide what to watch on a movie night? Heres a movie that promises to have it all in one rollercoaster ride thats bound to make you feel in love, scared, and intrigued at the same time. Here are some reasons why you need to watch Life Risking Romance.

1. The lead is none other than Ha Ji Won

Everyones favorite heroine Ha Ji Won stars in the film, and perhaps thats more than enough reason to watch it. Shes mostly known for her tough talking, butt-kicking femme fatale roles, but these days, shes trying her hand in lighter, more romantic roles. This time, shes taking on a quirky, clumsy role.

[HanCinema's Drama Review]
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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "My Secret Romance" Episode 3

So even though we saw Yoo-mi fantasizing about meeting Jin-wook by chance again last episode, this time, Yoo-mi is doing everything she can to avoid the reality of the situation. Which makes sense. Let's recall that, three years ago, Jin-wook was kind of a jerk, and that they were both just a tad drunk. So it's easy to empathize with Yoo-mi viewing Jin-wook's dictatorial demands here as being part and parcel of a mean personality rather than an overbearing effort on his part to be cute.

And indeed, it would be a little remiss for us to completely ignore the power imbalance here. Jin-wook is Yoo-mi's boss, and his attempt to jump start a relationship with her here is textbook sexual harassment. For all that, it's hard to hate Jin-wook that much when we can see from his perspective that Yoo-mi was his one moment of genuine empathy. Unless we count the cat, who sadly does not feature here. I was kind of hoping the cat would be a regular character.

[HanCinema's Film Review]
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[HanCinema's Film Review] "My Little Baby, Jaya"

The exploitation film is lurid for the sake of being lurid, enticing viewers with the promise that twisted depraved people will meet twisted depraved ends in the name of morose justice. The social awareness film, by contrast, seeks to make some sort of serious commentary about horrible unseen problems in daily life. "My Little Baby, Jaya" tries to be both of these things, with mixed success.

All right, I'll be honest. I kind of sort of hated "My Little Baby, Jaya" for nearly the entire runtime. We start out with Jaya (played by Oh Ye-seol) killing herself. Also her single dad Won-sool (played by Kim Jeong-gyoon) has cerebral palsy. High school bullying and cerebral palsy are conceivably interesting topics in their own right but undermine each other here. Considering Won-sool's cerebral palsy is at least partially why he couldn't do anything about Jaya's bullying, that kind of gives the impression that the social workers we see trying to take Jaya away as a kid had a point.

[HanCinema's Film Review]
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[HanCinema's Film Review] "Marianne and Margaret"

Back in 1962, Marianne Suede and Margaret Pisarek came to the obscure island of Sorok, way on the southern tip of Korea from their home country of Austria. As nuns, Marianne Suede and Margaret Pisarek were driven by their desire to do good works for the less fortunate, and came to Sorok Island to care for the sick. That's pretty much all they did for forty four years. Then they went back to Austria, spending the rest of their days in a nursing home.

All I could really get from "Marianne and Margaret" was that they were decent human beings who devoted themselves to public service. Even now I struggle to try and describe how Marianne Suede and Margaret Pisarek even differ from each other very much. Aside from the minutae of their lives in Austria, as described by director Yoon Se-young, they're just a couple of random foreigners who were very concerned about the welfare of the people on Sorok Island.