Hancinemas Film Review Some Day

176 Articles
[HanCinema's Film Review]
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[HanCinema's Film Review] "My Little Baby, Jaya"

The exploitation film is lurid for the sake of being lurid, enticing viewers with the promise that twisted depraved people will meet twisted depraved ends in the name of morose justice. The social awareness film, by contrast, seeks to make some sort of serious commentary about horrible unseen problems in daily life. "My Little Baby, Jaya" tries to be both of these things, with mixed success.

All right, I'll be honest. I kind of sort of hated "My Little Baby, Jaya" for nearly the entire runtime. We start out with Jaya (played by Oh Ye-seol) killing herself. Also her single dad Won-sool (played by Kim Jeong-gyoon) has cerebral palsy. High school bullying and cerebral palsy are conceivably interesting topics in their own right but undermine each other here. Considering Won-sool's cerebral palsy is at least partially why he couldn't do anything about Jaya's bullying, that kind of gives the impression that the social workers we see trying to take Jaya away as a kid had a point.

[HanCinema's Film Review]
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[HanCinema's Film Review] "Marianne and Margaret"

Back in 1962, Marianne Suede and Margaret Pisarek came to the obscure island of Sorok, way on the southern tip of Korea from their home country of Austria. As nuns, Marianne Suede and Margaret Pisarek were driven by their desire to do good works for the less fortunate, and came to Sorok Island to care for the sick. That's pretty much all they did for forty four years. Then they went back to Austria, spending the rest of their days in a nursing home.

All I could really get from "Marianne and Margaret" was that they were decent human beings who devoted themselves to public service. Even now I struggle to try and describe how Marianne Suede and Margaret Pisarek even differ from each other very much. Aside from the minutae of their lives in Austria, as described by director Yoon Se-young, they're just a couple of random foreigners who were very concerned about the welfare of the people on Sorok Island.

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[Guest Film Review] "Mrs. B. A North Korean Woman"

Winner of the Best Film of the Documentary Competition in Moscow and Best International Documentary Film in Zurich Film, "Mrs B" is a very impressive documentary, shot in true guerilla style.

Jero Yun was conducting a research for North Korean refugees in China for his previous film, "Looking for North Koreans" and spent time with a network of smugglers working between North Korea, China, South Korea and the United States. That is where he met Mrs. B. (whose actual name is not mentioned in the film), who put him in contact with North Korean refugees living clandestinely in China, and eventually in her farm where she told him her story, thus becoming the focus of this film.

[HanCinema's Film Review]
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[HanCinema's Film Review] "Suh-Suh Pyoung, Slowly and Peacefully"

Elizabeth Johanna Shepping's mother came to the United States in search of opportunity. That did not end well. After a disaffected childhood where she was used to having no friends, Shepping eventually moved back in with her mother and stepfather, only to have a falling out over religious differences. In her quest for salvation, Shepping eventually settles upon colonial Korea as the outlet for her work, adopting the Korean name Suh Pyoung in order to better fit in.

It's quite an appropriate title- literally meaning something like "reading instructor", Suh Pyoung made it her life's work to teach as many people as possible, particularly women and orphans, how to read. Hence the religious falling out with her Catholic mother, who did not see direct understanding of Scripture as relevant to salvation. But with every step Shepping makes in Korea, her ideals are vindicated. The people there need her.

[HanCinema's Film Review]
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[HanCinema's Film Review] "The Mayor"

Jong-goo (played by Choi Min-sik) is the mayor of Seoul, who is in the midst of running for his third term in office. Why exactly Jong-goo is so determined to hold on to power is...unclear. At this point Jong-goo seems to be working by inertia alone. The notion that he could ever not possibly be the most powerful man in the room is abhorrent to Jong-goo. To the man's credit, he does tend to only utilize his awesome political powers in the case of an emergency. There's a lot of those in an election year, as young campaign staffperson Kyeong (played by Sim Eun-kyeong) learns to her slow dismay.